Simple shopping

Women carrying shopping bags on scooter

This English speaking lesson give you some idea how to make questions and answers during a shopping as well as bargaining, price and cost.

1. Where are the pencils? They’re on the second shelf. Okay, thanks.
2. How much is this mirror? It’s $19.95. Okay. I’ll take it.
3. How much does this cost? That one is $5.00. How about this one?
4. How much are these? They’re $4.00 each. That’s too expensive.
5. Do you have any t-shirts? What size? Medium or Large? Large.
6. That comes to $26.59. Here’s $30.00. Your change is $3.41
7. That will be $17.48. Here’s $17.50. Keep the change. Thanks.

 

Vocabular

Types of shops in English

department store – a shop that sells many different items in different departments. Harrods is probably the world’s best known department store.

supermarket – a large shop that sells mostly food and household items.

grocer (UK) / grocery store (US) – a shop that sells food.

greengrocer – sells fresh fruit and vegetables.

butcher – sells fresh meat.

baker – sells fresh bread and cakes.

fishmonger – sells fresh fish.

chemist (UK) / drugstore (US) – sells medicines and toiletries.

pharmacy (US) – sells medicines.

newsagent – sells newspapers and magazines.

stationer – sells paper goods.

optician – sells glasses / contact lenses.

DIY store – sells things for home improvement.

hardware shop / hardware store / ironmonger – hard goods, such as nails and screws.

corner shop (UK) – a shop on the corner of your street, selling a range of basic goods – food, newspapers, sweets, bread, etc.

delicatessen (deli) – sells specialist food not normally found in supermarkets. For example, an Italian deli, an Asian deli.

bookshop / bookstore – books.

market – market traders (people who work on a market) have stalls that sell fruit and vegetables, clothes, household items and so on.

petshop – for pets and pet food.

flea market – a group of stalls selling old furniture or clothes.

tea shop (UK) – like a cafe, but sells tea and cakes.

petrol station (UK) / gas station (US) sells petrol, car products and sometimes food.

Using ‘s

When we talk about shops, we often put an ‘s on the end. For example, “I’m going to the chemist’s / greengrocer’s / butcher’s / baker’s / newsagent’s / fishmonger’s / optician’s.”

We don’t use an ‘s with these shops: supermarket, hardware store, petrol station, department store.

Sales vocabulary

December 26 (or Boxing Day) is traditionally the start of the winter sales in the UK, when items are heavily discounted. In fact, bargain hunters can find some items reduced up to 50% off their pre-sale price.

An unbeatable offer / prices slashed (= cut) or give-away prices mean very low prices.

Clearance Sale / Everything must go! = signs in shop windows advertising the sales

snap up a bargain = to buy something cheaply

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